Seminar

Preventing nutrient deficiencies

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The recording of my webinar on preventing nutrient deficiencies is now available in the videoteca section of the Campus del Césped website.

Or watch the English version right here.

This was fun. I hope you'll read the handout too. It is only 4 pages, with lots of white space, and gives a brief overview of this important topic. If you are still interested, then watch the video of the webinar at your leisure, and watch or download the slides too.

Links in English

Links in Spanish


This is a lot to fit into an hour

But I am going to try. I've got four things I want to explain in this upcoming webinar, and I have made some interesting calculations. Can calculations be provocative? Maybe these ones are provocative and interesting.

The Campus del Césped webinar is on 12 January at 17:00 Central European Time. You can register here.

Here is the 4 page pdf handout, in English.

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These are the slides in English.



These are the slides in Spanish.



If you are are joining this webinar, you will find it useful to review the slides and handout prior to the event.


Optimum playing conditions, minimum inputs

"Mekong River diverted into Thailand's waterways, worrying drought-stricken neighbours like Vietnam," says a recent headline. "Drought exacts toll on crops in region," says another. And "China has embarked on an unprecedented 'water diplomacy' mission to alleviate the drought in Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam by discharging massive quantities of fresh water downstream from one of its dams," says a third article.

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The recent R&A Seminars on Sustainable Golf Course Design, Renovation and Maintenance in Asia, held in early March in Beijing and then in mid-March near Bangkok, were timely in addressing the use of water (and other resources) on golf courses.

Selection_037At these seminars, I spoke about how one can optimize the playing conditions of the golf course while minimizing inputs of resources such as water.

This 12 page handout has details of what I discussed, and includes links to articles and all my presentations.

One of the easiest ways to reduce the amount of water required is to minimize the area of maintained turf.

Another way to reduce the water requirement is to use drought tolerant species. In particular, one can produce the best surfaces with the fewest inputs by using native species.

I also explained how to calculate the irrigation water requirement for any area of turf. First, estimate the water use by evapotranspiration, then subtract the quantity of effective rainfall and adjust for the surface area to be irrigated. Then, make further adjustments for the distribution uniformity of the irrigation system and the salinity of the water, and one is left with the quantity of water required as irrigation.

It is quite useful to have this number, and especially to make that calculation for a drought year. In that way, the necessary amount of water storage can be built, or one can adjust the turfgrass area or turfgrass species to make sure the golf course will be sustainable in terms of water.

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If there isn't enough water for irrigation, then some grasses will die. Seashore paspalum is the grass that requires the most water to survive in Southeast Asia, and it dies when irrigation water is not supplied. Calculating the irrigation water requirement and planning to have that much water available can be quite useful. As this article states, regarding the current drought, and planning for water availability in such conditions:

Such long-term planning is unfortunately uncommon, say agriculture experts. Dr Leocadio Sebastian, a Vietnam-based regional programme leader for the Consultative Group On International Agricultural Research, says governments tend to be reactive. "They tend to favour relief intervention."

For golf course turf, one can't expect relief intervention, so it is better to plan ahead by choosing grasses that require fewer inputs.


Delegate maps, presentations, and photos from Sustainable Turfgrass Management in Asia 2016

It was another fun conference in Thailand, as the TGCSA welcomed 283 delegates from 24 countries to Pattaya for the Sustainable Turfgrass Management in Asia 2016 conference. This conference is organized by the TGCSA and ATC for the TGA, with support from the R&A.

Thailand sent the most delegates, with 153; next was Vietnam, with 23, and then Singapore with 18. These maps show the delegate counts by country.


Data: forPlot • Chart ID: GeoMapID4c09296ac8a7googleVis-0.5.10
R version 3.2.4 (2016-03-10) • Google Terms of UseDocumentation and Data Policy

Data: forPlot • Chart ID: GeoMapID4c096e53e2b9googleVis-0.5.10
R version 3.2.4 (2016-03-10) • Google Terms of UseDocumentation and Data Policy

Presentation slides from this year's conference (and previous years) are available for download.

Boy Yothin took hundreds of photos from the conference, field day, and AGIF turfgrass management exhibition and made them available in this Facebook album. A few of his photos from the conference are shown below.

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Animated charts showing photosynthetically active radiation for a year

I spoke at the Sustainable Turfgrass Management in Asia 2016 conference about light at different locations. The presentations slides can be viewed here, or embedded below. For more about the conference, which saw 278 delegates from 24 countries and 5 continents travel to Pattaya this year, see this post at the Asian Turf Seminar site.

Light is important. Without enough light, grass won't grow well. I suggested that "no-problem" daily light integral (DLI) values for putting greens of bermudagrass, seashore paspalum, and zoysiagrass, may be about 40, 30, and 20 respectively. And I showed what PAR is, and how PAR is measured in one second as the photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), and then how all the PPFD over the course of a day are added together to make up the DLI.

I showed charts for one day, and also animated charts that show PPFD and DLI for every day of the year. This chart shows the maximum expected PPFD by time of day, and maximum possible DLI by day of the year, at Tokyo and Bangkok if there were no clouds. You may need to click the browser's "refresh" button to play these animations.

Result

I wanted to visualize how these maximum possible values, on days when the sky is clear and about 75% of the extraterrestrial radiation reaches the earth's surface. To do that, I looked up the global solar radiation for Tokyo for every hour of 2015, converted those values to PAR units, and plotted them together with the maximum possible values assuming 75% transmittance of extraterrestrial radiation. That is plotted here.

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I also explained that the global solar radiation has a large influence on the evapotranspiration (ET). I demonstrated this ET calculator that uses the Hargreaves equation to estimate the ET based on global solar radiation.


Video report from The R&A sustainability seminar in Beijing

This report gives a summary of last week's R&A Seminar on Sustainable Golf Course Design, Renovation and Maintenance in Asia, held at the National Convention Center in Beijing in conjunction with the China Golf Show.

At the seminar, "more than 200 golf course superintendents, developers, managers and academics from throughout China learned from a number of speakers that sustainability is more than a concept or an idea. It applies directly to their golf courses and facilities and can have a tangible and measurable impact on the success of their operations."


Report from the China Golf Show

It's always a fun time at the China Golf Show in Beijing. There are the seminars, the old friends, the technology, and the Peking Duck. This year also featured The R&A Seminar on Sustainable Golf Course Design, Renovation, and Maintenance in Asia in conjunction with the Show. Here are a few highlights:

I saw a few people that I used to work with at Shanghai Links, including David Young with Nelson & Haworth. We reminisced about our work together 18 years ago. "Was it really that long ago!?"

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The helicopter and drone sprayers are really interesting for spot applications and for treatment of extreme terrain. Integrated pest management and spot treatments taken to a whole new level. Cool stuff.

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In my seminars (handout here) I talked about things that can help to produce better playing conditions with fewer inputs. It's not surprise that I'm not a huge fan of sandcapping. I shared some data to show why. Sandcapped surfaces tend to get soft -- really soft, like ballmark in fairway soft and mud on ball soft -- unless extensive work is done to control organic matter.

All my presentation slides from The R&A Seminar on Sustainable Golf Course Design, Renovation, and Maintenance in Asia are available on my Speaker Deck page.

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Optimum playing conditions with minimum inputs: handout and slides from seminars in Beijing and Bangkok

The R&A Seminar on Sustainable Golf Course Design, Renovation, and Maintenance in Asia was held March 3 and 4 in Beijing and will be March 10 in Thailand.

This is my handout for the five presentations I made at this seminar. Links to all my presentations are in the handout, and I've embedded a couple of the presentations below, or you can find them all on Speaker Deck.

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Update from Beijing – Day One of The R&A Seminar on Sustainable Golf Course Design, Renovation & Maintenance in Asia

It was an exciting day in Beijing and I was glad to be a part of this seminar. Here's the day one update from The R&A.

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Liang Wen Chong

2 March, 2016, Beijing: The R&A's Sustainable Golf Seminar teed off in Beijing with a team of renowned sustainable golf experts sharing best practice, responsible and practical approaches to golf developments, renovations and course management. A mix of golf course operators, academics and other stakeholders listened and engaged with the speakers on lively discussions on what sustainability is and why it matters, opportunities and threats specifically in China, and a drill down on best practice on project planning and course design.

The quote of the day came from Professor Hu Lin, Director of Green Environment Center of China Agricultural University at the end of his presentation which was packed with statistics on land and water use of golf clubs, and lower grade and contaminated land in China.

“It is unnecessary to use any arable land for golf course construction in China. If only a small part of waste land and other poor land is used, it will be large enough for the development of golf industry in China.”

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Wang Liwei, Vice President of China Golf Association, Liang Wen Chong, Captain of the China Olympic Golf Team,Dominic Wall, Director of Asia-Pacific, The R&A

 

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Paul Jansen,Prof. Hu Lin,Dominic Wall,Steve Isaac,Liang Wen Chong,Jonathan Smith, Micah Woods, Lu Jun