Seminar

Delegate maps, presentations, and photos from Sustainable Turfgrass Management in Asia 2016

It was another fun conference in Thailand, as the TGCSA welcomed 283 delegates from 24 countries to Pattaya for the Sustainable Turfgrass Management in Asia 2016 conference. This conference is organized by the TGCSA and ATC for the TGA, with support from the R&A.

Thailand sent the most delegates, with 153; next was Vietnam, with 23, and then Singapore with 18. These maps show the delegate counts by country.


Data: forPlot • Chart ID: GeoMapID4c09296ac8a7googleVis-0.5.10
R version 3.2.4 (2016-03-10) • Google Terms of UseDocumentation and Data Policy

Data: forPlot • Chart ID: GeoMapID4c096e53e2b9googleVis-0.5.10
R version 3.2.4 (2016-03-10) • Google Terms of UseDocumentation and Data Policy

Presentation slides from this year's conference (and previous years) are available for download.

Boy Yothin took hundreds of photos from the conference, field day, and AGIF turfgrass management exhibition and made them available in this Facebook album. A few of his photos from the conference are shown below.

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Animated charts showing photosynthetically active radiation for a year

I spoke at the Sustainable Turfgrass Management in Asia 2016 conference about light at different locations. The presentations slides can be viewed here, or embedded below. For more about the conference, which saw 278 delegates from 24 countries and 5 continents travel to Pattaya this year, see this post at the Asian Turf Seminar site.

Light is important. Without enough light, grass won't grow well. I suggested that "no-problem" daily light integral (DLI) values for putting greens of bermudagrass, seashore paspalum, and zoysiagrass, may be about 40, 30, and 20 respectively. And I showed what PAR is, and how PAR is measured in one second as the photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), and then how all the PPFD over the course of a day are added together to make up the DLI.

I showed charts for one day, and also animated charts that show PPFD and DLI for every day of the year. This chart shows the maximum expected PPFD by time of day, and maximum possible DLI by day of the year, at Tokyo and Bangkok if there were no clouds. You may need to click the browser's "refresh" button to play these animations.

Result

I wanted to visualize how these maximum possible values, on days when the sky is clear and about 75% of the extraterrestrial radiation reaches the earth's surface. To do that, I looked up the global solar radiation for Tokyo for every hour of 2015, converted those values to PAR units, and plotted them together with the maximum possible values assuming 75% transmittance of extraterrestrial radiation. That is plotted here.

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I also explained that the global solar radiation has a large influence on the evapotranspiration (ET). I demonstrated this ET calculator that uses the Hargreaves equation to estimate the ET based on global solar radiation.


Video report from The R&A sustainability seminar in Beijing

This report gives a summary of last week's R&A Seminar on Sustainable Golf Course Design, Renovation and Maintenance in Asia, held at the National Convention Center in Beijing in conjunction with the China Golf Show.

At the seminar, "more than 200 golf course superintendents, developers, managers and academics from throughout China learned from a number of speakers that sustainability is more than a concept or an idea. It applies directly to their golf courses and facilities and can have a tangible and measurable impact on the success of their operations."


Report from the China Golf Show

It's always a fun time at the China Golf Show in Beijing. There are the seminars, the old friends, the technology, and the Peking Duck. This year also featured The R&A Seminar on Sustainable Golf Course Design, Renovation, and Maintenance in Asia in conjunction with the Show. Here are a few highlights:

I saw a few people that I used to work with at Shanghai Links, including David Young with Nelson & Haworth. We reminisced about our work together 18 years ago. "Was it really that long ago!?"

Micah_david

The helicopter and drone sprayers are really interesting for spot applications and for treatment of extreme terrain. Integrated pest management and spot treatments taken to a whole new level. Cool stuff.

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In my seminars (handout here) I talked about things that can help to produce better playing conditions with fewer inputs. It's not surprise that I'm not a huge fan of sandcapping. I shared some data to show why. Sandcapped surfaces tend to get soft -- really soft, like ballmark in fairway soft and mud on ball soft -- unless extensive work is done to control organic matter.

All my presentation slides from The R&A Seminar on Sustainable Golf Course Design, Renovation, and Maintenance in Asia are available on my Speaker Deck page.

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Optimum playing conditions with minimum inputs: handout and slides from seminars in Beijing and Bangkok

The R&A Seminar on Sustainable Golf Course Design, Renovation, and Maintenance in Asia was held March 3 and 4 in Beijing and will be March 10 in Thailand.

This is my handout for the five presentations I made at this seminar. Links to all my presentations are in the handout, and I've embedded a couple of the presentations below, or you can find them all on Speaker Deck.

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Update from Beijing – Day One of The R&A Seminar on Sustainable Golf Course Design, Renovation & Maintenance in Asia

It was an exciting day in Beijing and I was glad to be a part of this seminar. Here's the day one update from The R&A.

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Liang Wen Chong

2 March, 2016, Beijing: The R&A's Sustainable Golf Seminar teed off in Beijing with a team of renowned sustainable golf experts sharing best practice, responsible and practical approaches to golf developments, renovations and course management. A mix of golf course operators, academics and other stakeholders listened and engaged with the speakers on lively discussions on what sustainability is and why it matters, opportunities and threats specifically in China, and a drill down on best practice on project planning and course design.

The quote of the day came from Professor Hu Lin, Director of Green Environment Center of China Agricultural University at the end of his presentation which was packed with statistics on land and water use of golf clubs, and lower grade and contaminated land in China.

“It is unnecessary to use any arable land for golf course construction in China. If only a small part of waste land and other poor land is used, it will be large enough for the development of golf industry in China.”

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Wang Liwei, Vice President of China Golf Association, Liang Wen Chong, Captain of the China Olympic Golf Team,Dominic Wall, Director of Asia-Pacific, The R&A

 

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Paul Jansen,Prof. Hu Lin,Dominic Wall,Steve Isaac,Liang Wen Chong,Jonathan Smith, Micah Woods, Lu Jun

The R&A Seminar on Sustainable Golf Course Design, Renovation and Maintenance in Asia

There are a lot of seminars happening in Asia in early March. Two new events are available this year, one in China and another in Thailand. These are The R&A Seminar on Sustainable Golf Course Design, Renovation and Maintenance in Asia.

The first is on March 3 and 4 in Beijing:

The R&A is to host a free to attend seminar in China that promotes responsible and practical approaches to golf course design, renovation and maintenance - highlighting the ongoing work of the industry in raising the expectations for golf.  This seminar will provide the most comprehensive sustainable education event in Asia across golf developments, renovations and course management.

The R&A Seminar on Sustainable Golf Course Design, Renovation and Maintenance in Asia will be held in Beijing on 3 and 4 March, as part of the China Golf Show at the National Convention Centre.

Thailand

The second is on March 10 in Thailand, focusing on "golf developments, renovations and course management."

The R&A Seminar on Sustainable Golf Course Design, Renovation and Maintenance in Asia will be held at the Amata Spring Country Club on 10 March.

Both seminars are free to attend.

More information and registration for the China seminar is here: registration closes on February 26.

Details and registration for the Thailand seminar are here: registration closes on March 4.


Presentation slides for my 5 talks at the Northern Green Expo

Here are links to the handout and the presentation slides for the 5 talks I gave at the Northern Green Expo. Topics? I tried to explain how I think of the four factors that influence turfgrass growth: light, water, temperature, and nutrients (of which nitrogen is used in the largest quantities by the grass). Then, I talked about how I would put this understanding to use in the day-to-day management of turfgrass.

First, with all the details, the 31 page PDF handout. If you are interested in these topics, I hope you'll read it.

Then the presentation slides, in the order they were delivered.

The (New) Fundamentals of Turfgrass Nutrition

Nutrient Use by the Grass and Nutrient Supply by the Soil

Calculating the Fertilizer Requirement for Any Turfgrass, Anywhere

Soil Water Management: Timing, Amount, and Syringing

Instead of Shade, Let's Talk About Light


My handouts for the Northern Green Expo

I'm giving five presentations at the Northern Green Expo.

  • The (New) Fundamentals of Turfgrass Nutrition
  • Nutrient Use by the Grass and Nutrient Supply by the Soil
  • Calculating the Fertilizer Requirement for any Turfgrass, Anywhere
  • Soil Water Management: Amount, Timing, and Syringing
  • Instead of Shade, Let's Talk About Light

I combined the handouts for each presentation into this single document for easy reading. I especially like this part:

Selection_060 Selection_061


This pretty much covers everything

Selection_039In January at the Northern Green Expo, I get to talk about light, water, temperature, and nitrogen. Those are the factors that influence growth, and getting the growth rate right is what greenkeeping is all about.

There are five different seminars, all linked by that common theme.

The (New) Fundamentals of Turfgrass Nutrition

Most seminars, presentations, articles, and even semester-long courses about turfgrass nutrition discuss the functions of different elements. Potassium is involved in stomatal regulation, phosphorus is essential for root development, calcium for cell wall strength, and so on. All true, but largely irrelevant for the turfgrass manager. What the turfgrass manager must know is not the function of each element, but the quantities -- is enough of this element present to meet the grass requirements, or is it not? If it isn't present in adequate quantities, how much must be added to ensure the grass has enough? In this seminar, the fundamentals of turfgrass nutrition will be explained, with a focus on an understanding of the amount of each nutrient that is required.

Nutrient Use by the Grass and Nutrient Supply by the Soil

Grass grows in soil, and nutrients used by the grass come either from the soil or from fertilizer. When the soil contains enough of an element to meet all of the grass requirements, none of that element is required as fertilizer. When the grass can use more of an element than can be supplied by the soil, that element must be applied as fertilizer. This seminar will explain how to estimate the maximum amount of an element the grass can use, how to identify the quantity that can be supplied by the soil, and how to use those two amounts to get an estimate of the amount that may be required as fertilizer.

Calculating the Fertilizer Requirement for Any Turfgrass, Anywhere

This presentation builds on the fundamentals of the turfgrass nutrition talk, and the nutrient use and nutrient supply talk, by explaining a system by which a turfgrass manager can calculate the amount of any element required by any turfgrass, under any growing condition, anywhere in the world. Some common misapprehensions about turfgrass nutrition and soil testing will also be discussed. The minimum levels for sustainable nutrition (MLSN) guidelines for interpreting soil test results, and the temperature-based turfgrass growth potential (GP), which were introduced in the two previous seminars, will be discussed in even more detail.

Soil Water Management: Timing, Amount and Syringing

Fifteen years ago, it was rare to use a soil moisture meter. Today, it seems that almost every turfgrass manager has some idea of the soil moisture content. In this presentation, Micah Woods will show that daily irrigation can use less water than infrequent irrigation, while maintaining a lower soil moisture content than deep and infrequent irrigation. Woods will explain how soil moisture meters can be used to prove that, how they can be used to measure the real evapotranspiration rate, and why syringing turf for the purpose of cooling the surface is a waste of time, water, and energy.

Instead of Shade, Let's Talk About Light

Shade from trees, buildings, clouds or mountains affects a lot of turfgrass areas, and shade can make it impossible to produce the desired turfgrass conditions. Rather than talk about the impossible, in this presentation Woods will talk about light. Specifically, he'll discuss photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), the photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), and the daily light integral (DLI). These sound complicated but are quite simple and can be easily measured or estimated. With an understanding and ability to measure and communicate about PAR, PPFD, and DLI, it makes it a lot easier to manage those previously impossible shade problems.